Oysters have been a topic of intrigue and mystery since the days of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Many oyster tales still abound in today’s popular culture, some rooted in scientific fact, others purely misconception.

 

ARE OYSTERS APHRODISIACS?

While there is no verifiable scientific proof that oysters are aphrodisiacs, history suggests otherwise. It is commonly believed that the high trace metal content of oysters could correct mineral imbalances in an individual, producing noticeable changes in certain physical functions and performances. Yippee!

DO GLIDDEN POINT OYSTERS HAVE PEARLS?

While it is biologically possible for our oysters to produce pearls, it is unlikely that they would. Our oysters are genetically selected and raised for fast growth and excellent food quality characteristics. Pearl production could actually be a liability in oysters raised for the half-shell trade. Pearls may be found in any bivalves that have an irritant introduced either naturally or artificially. Oysters raised for commercial pearl production are of an entirely different species, and more closely related to the mussel.

THE MYTH ABOUT MONTHS WITH AN “R”

Should oysters only be eaten during months which contain the letter “R?” NO! Today that supposition is purely myth, although at one point in history it was probably a necessary safety precaution. Before biotoxin monitory was possible (or even contemplated) it is possible that people in coastal communities became accustomed to avoiding shellfish consumption during the summer months as a method of avoiding PSP related illness caused by blooms of toxic dinoflagellates we now refer to as “Red Tide.” Also, in most traditional oyster grounds oysters spawn during the summer months leaving their meats watery, runny, lacking flavor, and generally not worth eating until they recover a bit by feeding for a month or two.

Learn more about Red Tide on our Is It Safe? page.